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Nature

Weather Network meteorologist: Winter temperatures won't outstay their welcome in Kane County

Kane County residents hoping for warmer weather likely will not have a long wait, according to Michael Carter, a meteorologist with The Weather Network.

Carter, discussing the network's spring forecast for the Kane County area, said "we are not expecting winter temperatures to outstay their welcome." A warmup starts this weekend, with a high of 51 expected for Sunday as of Friday morning. A high of 57 was forecast for Monday, and on Tuesday, the forecast high was 63.

He said residents can expect above-normal temperatures for most of March.

"The story this year is that you'll definitely be on pace, if not ahead of pace, for the spring warmup," Carter said.

Once the warmup begins Sunday, he said it was unlikely there would be more bitterly cold weather this season. He added that didn't necessarily mean there would not be any more additional snow.

"We can't really close the door yet on winter," he said. "You can't rule out one last parting shot."

Carter said the area is emerging from a mild winter influenced by El Nino, a weather event that starts with especially warm waters in the Pacific Ocean and affects weather worldwide. He said Kane County can expect a warm, dry spring and "really nice, pleasant spring temperatures through mid-May."

"There is a downside to it as well," he said, adding that "if we were to get into a condition where we had a period of dry weather, it could be a concern to farmers."

As far as severe weather, Carter said while tropical areas can expect more activity, the Midwest likely will not see any unusual activity.

"It will be probably about the normal amount of severe weather, not more than normal, but not less than normal, either," he said.

For information and long-term forecasts, visit www.weathernetwork.com.

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