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Health

I drank what?

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With the weather warming up, many of us will be outside working and playing. When you get thirsty you are going to reach for something to drink, but do you know what you are drinking and how it could affect your teeth.


So how do sports drinks and soda damage your teeth? The outer layer of the tooth, enamel, starts to break down at a pH of 5.5. Soda and sports drinks are in the pH range of 2 to 3.5. This will soften the outer layer of the tooth and then allow for bacteria to get through the enamel.


A cavity forms by bacteria using sugar as it fuel to grow and the bacteria makes acid that softens the enamel of the tooth. By sipping on the sports drinks or soda, you are softening the tooth so the bacteria does not has much to go before it gets through the enamel to the softer part of the tooth. Once this happen, you have a cavity.


Sports drinks are good for a person who is working out for 60 plus minutes to help replenish the lost electrolytes but they should not be sipped on all day. For the rest of us, water is best to quench your thirst.


For more questions, please CALL (630)-879-7642 TODAY to speak with a friendly dental professional at Dr. Ron Murphy’s office!
Follow us on Facebook at RonaldMurphydentistry